United States: Antiquated Telephone Era Policy Harms Public Health and Slows Economic Recovery

By: Joseph Woodson 24/7 Rush Hour Traffic Technology advances fast—much faster than government. In the time since the Federal Communication Commission (“FCC”) updated the nation’s broadband table stakes[1], the public’s need for high speed internet significantly changed.[2] Cellphones, televisions, smart home devices, tablets, laptops, game consoles, etc. All these electronics are normally and routinely relied … Continue reading United States: Antiquated Telephone Era Policy Harms Public Health and Slows Economic Recovery

Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue: The Supreme Court leaves more Questions than Answers in State Educational Choice Programs

By: Ken Jensen In Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, 207 L. Ed. 2d 679 (2020), the U.S. Supreme Court held that if a state offers an educational choice program, it cannot bar a religious schools based solely on their religious character. Over fifteen years ago, the Court had held that the Establishment Clause did … Continue reading Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue: The Supreme Court leaves more Questions than Answers in State Educational Choice Programs

Qualified Immunity—The Ultimate Circular Legal Doctrine

By: Katie Wotherspoon In the wake of numerous murders of Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement, a nationwide debate exploded regarding structural racism and police accountability—the legal doctrine of qualified immunity in particular, amassed much of the scrutiny. The killings not only sparked national outrage they were also met with vehement protests in … Continue reading Qualified Immunity—The Ultimate Circular Legal Doctrine

Corporate America and the Status Quo: Minor Concessions in the Face of Revolutionary Demands

By: Ridgeway Woulfe Remove the racist nickname of the Washington football team. Acknowledge black lives matter. Address blackface in a real way. Recognize the disparity in police tactics regarding race. Allow and support peaceful protest. Stop whitewashing in the media. Stop honoring the confederacy. A lot is changing it seems. Society is ceding to demands … Continue reading Corporate America and the Status Quo: Minor Concessions in the Face of Revolutionary Demands

Gerrymandering Series: the Beginning, its Development, and the Contemporary Application

By: Robert Bryson The Beginning Gerrymandering is a political process in which electoral districts are drawn with convoluted or meandering boundaries. The term was coined in 1812 when Governor Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts signed into law a Boston-area electoral district that resembled a mythological salamander, however, the process of drawing abstract districts was an American … Continue reading Gerrymandering Series: the Beginning, its Development, and the Contemporary Application

Prison Islam: Conversion to Islam While Incarcerated Often Inspires Rehabilitation, Not Radicalization

By: Bria Burgamy Islam is not only the fastest-growing religion in the world, but also the fastest-growing religion in United States prisons, with tens of thousands of converts in U.S. prisons each year. According to Al Jazeera, ten to fifteen percent of prisoners nationwide practice Islam, compared to just one percent of the total U.S. … Continue reading Prison Islam: Conversion to Islam While Incarcerated Often Inspires Rehabilitation, Not Radicalization

Revitalization Without Gentrification: Is It Possible?

By:  Monet Valdez San Diego’s urban landscape has seen dramatic changes in the last decade. North Park, in particular, once hosted starving artists and low-income families. Its streets more closely resembled a scene from Max Brooks’ World War Z with its “drug houses, high crime, bars on windows, [and] empty store fronts.” Today, North Park … Continue reading Revitalization Without Gentrification: Is It Possible?

Feminism for Hijabis: A Critique of Laws that Prohibit Islamic Veiling in Western Countries

By:  Bria Burgamy Feminism. Beyoncé sings about it. Gloria Steinem mobilizes for it. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie writes about it. Women around the world are being called to step into their power, demand equality, and shatter glass ceilings – and rightfully so. As feminist movements gain momentum, however, some women are being left behind. Veiled Muslim … Continue reading Feminism for Hijabis: A Critique of Laws that Prohibit Islamic Veiling in Western Countries

Census Watch 2020: The Constitutionality of a Citizenship Question

By: Monet Valdez The United States Supreme Court is the most powerful judiciary body in our nation. Nine Justices sit atop the high court and make decisions that become the law of the land. The Court recently decided whether or not to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census. It is important that we … Continue reading Census Watch 2020: The Constitutionality of a Citizenship Question