California Ends Cash Money Bail System: Ends a Pay-to-Play System of Justice

By: Robert Bryson In the United States, bail refers to a system wherein a suspect is conditionally released from custody upon the surrender of payment of money or pledge of property to the court. The funds are then refunded when the suspect returns to court for their trial. If the suspect fails to return, the … Continue reading California Ends Cash Money Bail System: Ends a Pay-to-Play System of Justice

PIAC Gun Control Series: Who can Create Gun Control Regulations

By:  Ridgeway Woulfe We’ve addressed the need for a change in how America approaches gun violence.  We’ve addressed some options for reducing gun violence.  Now, we address WHO can take these steps.  America has placed the most attention upon the federal government.  Indeed, the federal government has the best ability to take the needed steps … Continue reading PIAC Gun Control Series: Who can Create Gun Control Regulations

Supreme Court Promotes a Double Standard for Religious Animus: Presidents to State Commissions

By:  Ken Jensen In her dissent to the majority opinion upholding Trump’s travel ban, Justice Sotomayor identifies a compelling contradiction with the Court’s previous opinion regarding gay wedding cakes.  In Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm'n, the Court decided whether a baker could refuse to design or bake a cake for a same-sex … Continue reading Supreme Court Promotes a Double Standard for Religious Animus: Presidents to State Commissions

PIAC’s Supreme Court Review: Masterpiece Cake, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm’n.

By: Ken Jensen After reading the Court’s opinion in Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm'n, 138 S. Ct. 1719 (2018), I am struck with how our society is still confused with respect to sexual orientation.  The Court struck down the Colorado Civil Rights Commission’s actions to assess a cakeshop owner’s reasons for declining … Continue reading PIAC’s Supreme Court Review: Masterpiece Cake, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm’n.

PIAC Gun Control Series: The History of the 2nd Amendment

By:  Jessica Colburn The Second Amendment, while hotly debated, is not well understood because the language of the Amendment is unclear and old, specifically 227 years old. Here, we shed some light on what is meant by the language of the Second Amendment, including the phrases, “a well-regulated militia” and “the right of the people … Continue reading PIAC Gun Control Series: The History of the 2nd Amendment

California Supreme Court Expands the Public Records Act to Include Emails Sent Between the Private Accounts of Public Officials, If the Emails Concern Public Business

By:  Robert Bryson City of San Jose vs. Superior Court (Smith) 2017 2 Cal.5th 608 The Public Records Act (“PRA”) is the California equivalent of the federal Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) which mandates that government communications and records (aside from a few exceptions) are public property and disclosable to any member of the public … Continue reading California Supreme Court Expands the Public Records Act to Include Emails Sent Between the Private Accounts of Public Officials, If the Emails Concern Public Business

Counterpoint: Jerry Brown Denies Parole to Leslie Van Houten, Charles Manson Follower and Convicted Murder Shows Some Crimes Cannot Be Redeemed and Not Everyone is Eligible for Parole

By:  Robert Bryson Perhaps one of the biggest misconceptions surrounding California policies is that it is always progressive, it is always a leader, an example for the rest of the country and the world. But, that simply isn’t true. California is as much the founder of voluntary workers’ compensation in the United States as it … Continue reading Counterpoint: Jerry Brown Denies Parole to Leslie Van Houten, Charles Manson Follower and Convicted Murder Shows Some Crimes Cannot Be Redeemed and Not Everyone is Eligible for Parole

Voter Fraud: What is at stake in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute?

By: Robert Bryson and Jessica Colburn In our journey down the rabbit hole of voter fraud, we have discussed how voter identification laws are still a thing, and whether voter fraud even happens. We also talked about Trump’s commission on voter fraud and its ultimate decommissioning. Most recently, we considered the delicate balance between encouraging … Continue reading Voter Fraud: What is at stake in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute?

Curbing Fraud vs. Encouraging the Vote: What is more important?

By: Robert Bryson This post will be the fourth in a five-part series examining “voter fraud,” its impact on elections, steps taken to curb it, and it will end with an analysis of Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute which is the Supreme Court case scheduled for arguments January 10, 2018 that will determine if … Continue reading Curbing Fraud vs. Encouraging the Vote: What is more important?